Where in the world is Gould Academy’s campus?

October 2, 2012

OVERHEARD IN SPANISH CLASS- Teacher:What do you call a word that describes a verb?”Student: “A proverb!”

Gould Academy has the largest boarding school campus in the world.

There; I said it.  And I’m not just talking about the cross-country and mountain biking trail system (although I did get lost in there for about 49 days once, only making it out by following a Sophomore cyclist who was also lost).  No, I mean REALLY big.  Multiple time zones-big. Get-on-a-flight, change-planes and-lose-your-luggage big.  That big.

See, I’m in Boston right now, and I’m here with a Gould vehicle, three other Gould teachers, on a Gould academy secret mission: To see how many times in a 26-hour period we can go to the airport.

Spirit of Full disclosure- I made that up.  The part about it being a secret mission.  Everyone knows we’re here.  We actually HAVE been to the airport several times, though.

I’m here because Gould Academy sometimes holds classes in China.  And Spain.  And Peru.  Here is some proof:

Kyler Walker, ’15, in China learning to make a sandwich the hard way.

Multiple Gould students teaching a class in Zaragoza, Spain. Fellow Glogger Courtney was there!

Your Glogger and Erin Murphy, ’07 in 2007, atop Machu Picchu (it’s also Erin’s birthday!).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hold classes in Wyoming, Québec, Chile, New York City, and southern California. To name a few places.

See? Gould classes are EVERYWHERE!  And why not?  Gould students will have to have a good understanding of the whole world they live in.  Remaining in the classroom just doesn’t cut it anymore.  Citizens of the world actually have to EXPERIENCE the world.  And not just through Facebook.  They have to live it.

The truth is, we’re here to pick up students from four schools in China who are coming to bring me endless supplies of hot peppers, dumplings, and Hi-Chew candies.

I wish.  The Chinese students are actually here completing our Ninth Grade Four Point exchange experience.  Last March our Ninth grade class traveled to their schools (and homes) on a cultural exchange.  And now the Chinese students are coming here!  I spent Monday in Boston with the kids from Xi’an, seeing important American historical monuments, like the “Make Way For Ducklings!” statues, and the Apple store.  More learning, more Gould.  If Gould had a student transcript that actually reflected the many things our students do, there would have to be spaces for classes like:

  • Incan architecture: From Ollantaytambo to Sacsahuaymán
  • Broadway: A lab class
  • Advanced topics in French:  Ordering in a Québec City restaurant
  • Advanced topics in Spanish: Buying your lift ticket in the Andes
  • The Geology of the Kennebec River Gorge-up close and personal
  • English Seminar:  On tour with Mr. Bean (skateboarding included)

This is one of the truly coolest things about Gould-we can (and do!) create classrooms everywhere we go.  think about THAT the next time you’re catching a wave at York Beach!

I leave you with a pic of todays class: Native waterfowl of the Boston Public Gardens. Next lesson is Boston History: Just who IS this guy Charlie, and WHY can’t he get off of that train?

“Students from Xi’an, making way for ducklings.”

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3 Responses

  1. Avatar Denise Manning says:

    Jefe,

    You crack me up! Every week! Really!

    denise

  2. Avatar Dr. Don, '60 says:

    Am I one of the few other Gould alums who have ever put a foot down in Ollantaytambo (said with a Porteno accent, of course!)? I have 8mm Kodachrome movies of my med school classmate, who had been an NCAA Western States’ trampoline champion at UC-Berkeley, doing handstands on the terraces there, as well as at Machu Picchu and everywhere else we put feet to earth on our way back to the hotel in Cusco in the summer of 1967. Small world. Gould alums were “going global,” even back then.

    • Avatar doug alford says:

      Dr. Don, I just showed a class some of my photos (now digital, of course!) of my visit to Ollantaytambo in 2007 with students (I was also there in 1995). A magical place- I would love to go back again!

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