Ninth Grade Four Point 2019: Peru

March 23, 2019

Peru Day 7

Thursday, March 23, 2019

Today we trekked to the Pumamarca Ruins where we learned about the hillside fortress that once guarded the sacred valley below in the 15th century. The trek starts from Ollantaytambo, the village we are staying in, and climbs steadily up the valley, along mountainsides, terraces, and across rivers to an unbelievable panoramic view of the entire area.  Our guide Walter educated us along the way about medicinal plants, the history of the land, and the ruins once we arrived.

Up we go!

Our guide Walter discussing medicinal plants of the area along the way.

Students returned to their homestays for the afternoon to eat, rest, spend time with the families, and prepare for our trek and camping portion of the trip leading up to Machu Picchu.

What a great day!

Peru Day 6

Thursday, March 22, 2019

A great day at the school with this group!

It was another active day with this wonderful group! We had our final morning of service work at the Kuska School, and we got a lot done! Some students painted tires, others painted signs, some made a fence, others did yard work to improve the campus, and some helped to facilitate another English class. It felt good to leave the school knowing that we did our part to make it a little more beautiful. We continue to be impressed with how engaged the students have been with the projects and the people at the school.

Garden fence installation, artwork included.

We had to leave the Gould mark complete with snowflakes.

Signs for around the campus

Ready to dig holes for the signs they just finished

English class briefing before the students arrive

English class included greetings with others as the students walked around the tire circle

The students loved the newly painted tires!

We then went back for the second day of weaving at the Quechua house. The students really got into it! It was also a chance to be together and chat.

We are meeting up a little earlier tomorrow morning to do a local hike, Pumamarca. We are all looking forward to it!

Peru Day 5

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Today we enjoyed lots of great activities with the students of the Yachay-Kuska School.

Aima briefing the group about the morning schedule

Our first task was to finish painting the base coat on the playground tires that the students use on a daily base for a variety of games. Once the tires were dry, the students came out with drafts of their personalized designs on paper and it was time to help them paint their designs on the tires.

A few students also were able to help out with an English class withe the First Grade class that was based around emotions like, hungry, sad, happy, angry, etc.

Later in the morning, we were able to take part in a goodbye ceremony for one of the long-time teachers of the school that was moving to Spain. It was a special moment for the school and so great to see the young children of the school share their thoughts and wishes for their teacher.

After lunch, we met up for a short walk to a Quechua village with an incredible view just outside of the town center of Ollantaytambo for a weaving lesson.  It took us all a bit to get the hang of it but progress was made and we’ll return again tomorrow to finish what we started.  This activity gave us all lots of respect for the fine workmanship and detailed work that we see when we walk through markets in the town center.

We’ll have our last service project day at the Yachay-Kuska School tomorrow before we get ready for some day trekking this weekend that will lead up to our visit to Machu Picchu on Monday!

Fun Fact: Did you know that Guinea Pig is a delicacy in Peru?

Peru Day 4

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Everyone seemed rested this morning and continues to enjoy their host families. They have all been excited to report about the delicious meals and how cute the kids are in their families.

We had a great morning at the Kuska School painting tires for the students to play with. The group was very engaged with the activity all morning. There were chances to play soccer with the elementary students, as well some middle schoolers from Colorado.

All the students then went back to their homestays for a leisurely lunch. They then had a little time to check out the markets.

We met back at the school for our second day of Quechua and music class. It’s a new language for everyone, so everyone is learning. They continued to practice a Quechua song to present to all the homestay families at our last meal.

The overall vibe of the group is positive as they become more comfortable with each other and with the experience.

 

Peru Day 3

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Exploring the Ollantaytambo Ruins

Ollantaytambo Ruins in the background.

The group met up in the town plaza this morning after their first night with their host families. Everyone had stories to share about their host families and all went well. Everyone stated that the English/Spanish dictionaries were getting lots of use as they all worked through conversations with their hosts.

Today was another very active day for the group as we explored the ruins of Ollantaytambo that date back to approximately the year 1450. This involved hiking through the terraces of the ruins where crops were planted based on the optimal elevation. There is also a sun temple that the Incans used to know when the winter and summer solstices were occurring based on when the sun hit certain parts of the stone formations they created.  It is believed that the ruins were built by the Incan Emperor Pachacuti.  The ruins also played a key role in holding off the Spanish Conquistadors around the year 1550. The stonework of the Incans is simply unbelievable knowing that they did not have the use of modern-day tools and their work has outlasted most everything else around it. Evidence of their work can be seen all throughout Ollantaytambo.

Terraces

Hiking above the terraces

Princess’s bath

 

The ancient irrigation system in the streets of Ollantaytambo

Signs of Incan stonework in the village

Pinkuylluna Ruins where the Incans stored their food

Pinkuylluna Ruins

The students returned to their host families for lunch at 1 pm and then we met back up at the Kuska School for lessons in Quechua, a traditional language of the area. We hope to learn a song in Quechua to sing to our host families before we leave.

Tomorrow we will be working on projects at the Kuska School and getting another lesson in Quechua.

Peru Day 2

Monday, March 18, 2019

Introduction of the Kuska School
The school was created by our guide, Aima Molinari Gonzales, who wanted to offer an alternative education to families in Ollantaytambo. The school focuses on three centers: thinking, feeling, and doing. A lot of their learning is project-based that go along with the kids’ interests. They help the children learn how to resolve conflicts without adults, and they are encouraged to share their opinions.
We visited the school today and it was really amazing to see the children outside and active. There are gardens that the children designed and cultivate. Overall, it’s a vibrant, thriving environment that we are happy to visit for the next few days.

The students met their homestay families today, and everyone seemed very excited! They were, of course, a little nervous, but meetings were happy and there were hugs all around!

Even the trip leaders have homestays on this trip which is unique to the Peru Four Point trip! After we got settled we walked around to each of the homes and checked in with everyone. They all seemed to be having a nice time so far. They all reported that they had big, wonderful lunches and were being very well taken care of.

Familia Sequeiros, Keiko, and Lily

Familia Ojeda, Tracy, and Kayla

Familia Gibaja, Allen, and Justin

Familia Ocon, Caleb, and Johnny

Familia Lozano, Phoebe, and Emma

We will meet them in the plaza tomorrow morning where we will head out for a guided tour to an Incan town and archaeological site that will be followed by Quechua language lessons combined with some traditional music.
The students are great travelers, engaged in learning, kind to each other, and are embracing the experience!

Peru Day 1

Sunday, March 17, 2019

We had a great first day in Peru after a long journey from Bethel, Boston, Bogota, and finally Cusco, Peru.
Our Host and founder of the Kuska School, Aima Molinari Gonzales, met us at the airport and took us on the beautiful drive from Cusco to Ollantaytambo.
We settled into our hostel, had a great Peruvian lunch, and a little time for journaling.
Aima and a local author/teacher, Ronald Castillo, briefed us on many topics about the history of the area, language, and culture.
The group was then sent off in pairs to check out the village with a task to interact with locals, purchase fruit, and find the town plaza which will serve as a key landmark for our time here.
We returned to the hostel for another great meal, sorted donations, held an evening group discussion, and retired for the night. Everyone was more than ready for bed!
Tomorrow we’ll tour the Kuska School, learn about our service project, and meet host families.

Pre-Trip: Are You Ready?

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Peru

In a few days, we’ll have ninth graders all over the world in Peru, China, Ecuador, and Tanzania as they take part in their first Gould Four Point experience. Ten students will be in Peru learning about the country, staying with local families, visiting schools, and immersing themselves in the culture there.

Students have been working on various topics related to their destinations in their History and English classes. They have also been preparing their journals, packing their bags, and thinking about all of the things they might learn on through this experience. Our older students who have already completed a Ninth Grade Four Point trip look back on their experience and say, “I learned more than I ever thought I would!”

We can’t wait to hear what this year’s students have to say about their experience.

Keep up to date with their trip by following this blog. Trip leaders will do their best to post updates regularly.

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